ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 3. Aug 2013, 21:04

Lieber Harry,

dieses Bild zusammen mit anderen gewidmet LZ 38 war in einen Sondernummer "Die deutsche Luftwaffe" der 'Illustrierten Zeitung' , Leipzig. Nr.3865, von 26.Juli 1917, Kriegsnummer 156, Band 149 als Illustrationen zum Artikel des Martin Lampel "Zeppelin - Bomben auf England" gedruckt. :D
Über das Buch, das ich erwähnt als Beispiel für die Werke dieses Autors ...also nicht aufregen. ;)
Beispiel dieses Artikel von eBay:
http://www.ebay.de/itm/Schwormstaedt-Zeppelin-Fuehrergondel-Kapitaen-Technik-Heer-Feindfahrt-England-1917-/260944194034
Leider, ich habe keine bis jetzt ... :cry:

Gruss - Glück ab!
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon Luftschiffharry » 4. Aug 2013, 06:12

Lieber Freund,
keine Aufregung - um Gottes Willen - nur Neugierde. Die Verbindung zur Illustrirten Zeitung war mir bekannt. Die entsprechenden Nummern der Zeitung habe ich aber nicht ... nur einen Ausschnitt des Propellerbildes. Schicke Ihnen was über den anderen Kanal. :mrgreen:

mit bestem Gruß - Glück ab !
der Luftschiffharry
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 6. Aug 2013, 08:31

Dear friends,

...example of interior design of this issue of the journal with drawings by Felix Schwormstädt that we talked about... ;)

Regards,
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 7. Aug 2013, 05:14

Dear friends,

as I promised earlier, I'm showing the full text of the part of the letter from the Military camp at Audley End (Saffron Walden, Essex) relating to the Zeppelin raid on London on September 8th,1915... :D

Regards,
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 29. Aug 2013, 21:51

Hello friends,

some mails before @TALLTREES told a story about Naval Zeppelin L 33 and its crash September 23rd, 1916 in Peldon/Essex.

Now, I can show some memorable items of this Zeppelin 8-) :

1) a part of Naval Zeppelin L 33;

Best regards,
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 29. Aug 2013, 22:01

...continuation...
2) the photo of L 33 crew during a British captivity;
3) the genuine L 33 crew member peakless cap.

History:
"...During the afternoon of September 23rd 1916, one of the ‘next generation’ super-Zeppelins, L33, took to the air for its first operational mission: the bombing of downtown London. Just a few months before, L33 was on the ground, getting its final fittings and adjustments. The L33 was truly a remarkable piece of engineering. She was 649’ long, with a 78 feet diameter and with a total gas capacity of 1,949,000 cubic feet. Six powerful Maybach 240hp Hslu engines gave the lumbering giant a top speed of 59 mph at a maximum operational ceiling of 13,500 feet. Beside its sheer size, what separated the L33 from its predecessor was its bomb load capacity. An impressive five tons of ordinance could be carried.

On that fateful afternoon, L33 was accompanied by ten additional super-Zeppelins of the Imperial German Navy. The mission called for the eleven to reach the British coastline at the same time. After which, each craft would take off to its pre-designed target area. Eight Zeppelins were assigned to strike targets around the Wash. The remaining three units were to hit the British capital. Taking part in the London raid was L31 under the command of Heinrich Mathy, L32, lead by the enigmatic Werner Peterson and the L33, controlled by Alois Bocker.

L33, which departed Nordholz, was fitted with almost three tons of free fall bombs. At approximately ten o’clock GMT, L33 flew over Britain’s coast. The huge dirigible was spotted by some local boys near Thames Estuary. From the Estuary, it moved on towards the north east in order to avoid the heavy saturated British defences in the east. At the same time, L31 and L32 were crossing the coast heading towards Dungeness, a path seldom explored by German and British planners.

At 11:48 pm, Bocker ordered L33’s bombs to be dropped. Six high explosive bombs landed on Hornchurch. Twenty minutes later, the L33 was seen passing West Ham by a couple of street policemen. They promptly alerted the authorities. Searchlights blanketed the pass between Ham and London. After five intensive minutes of searching, no Zeppelin was spotted, thus, the search was called off, for the time being.

A little over 12:05 in the morning, London’s powerful searchlights were turned on. The spotters must have seen the sight of the German slow moving dirigible, because an intense ground attack commenced short after. Bocker’s airship was cruising at 12,000 feet following the Ham’s banks when fire erupted. Despite it all, he and his crew kept up L33’s attack all the way up to Bromley-by-Bow, where the gas giant dropped its main ordinance. One 100kg bomb and five small, incendiary bomblets landed on St. Leonard’s and Empress Streets.

Four urban houses were damaged and six people were killed on this early stage of the raid. L33 went on to deliver several more bombs in and around Bow. But by this time, the airship was shadowed by British defences. Low trajectory shells began to find its mark. Several fragments of high detonation shells exploded only a few feet away from the ship’s skin puncturing one gas cell. Now the big air platform was in trouble. It began losing altitude fast. At 12:20 am, L33 was seen crossing Buckhurts Hill, leaking gas. Besieged by heavy ground fire, and declining altitude, Bocker decided to dump water from the ship’s ballast tanks, which caused the L33 to regain some of the height it had lost but the damage was done.

Near Kelvedon Common, a new and more ominous threat arrived: a British pursuit airplane. Second Lieutenant Alfred de Bathe Brandon was ready for the opportunity to engage the German ship. He had gained valuable experience in March 1916, when he almost single-handedly severely damaged L15. Brandon met L33 head on, emptying his Lewis gun, fifty explosive incendiary bullets, into the airship’s stern section. He swung around and hit the stern again, but his gun jammed forcing him to call off the engagement. L33 escaped, at least for the moment.

It was now 12:45 and the dirigible was passing by Chelmsford, still losing precious high. In an attempt to stem the descent, all non-essential materials aboard were jettisoned. Twenty five minutes after, at 1:10, Bocker’s ship passed over the Essex coastal area near Mersea Island. Its destination was the security of the Belgium skies. Unfortunately for Bocker and his crew, L33 was doomed. The Zeppelin was almost out of gas, losing altitude fast and its structure was compromised. It would go down and the only question for Bocker was where.

A crash landing at sea, at that hour, was deemed too risky. Better off, the commander thought, made a semi-controlled decent in British territory, then deal with the imprisonment issue. Immediately, the ship began to turnaround, now headed back to Essex. She managed to return to the coast. Two and a half miles inland, at 1:20am, L33 went down on a desert field near Peldon and Little Wigboroug church. The crew managed to escape before the gas giant was engulfed in a fire storm.

Soon after the fire died down, and with the metal frame still standing, Bocker ordered his men to climb back into what was left of the super-Zeppelin to destroy any classified material. Despite their best efforts, the British still were able to gather many essential documents and systems out of the wreck. Data that would be later incorporated on the R33 platform.

When the crew saw the first police cars arriving on the field, they promptly left the area. But the trip back to the coast was short lived. Specialist, Edgar Nicholas, apprehended the entire crew without even firing a shot.

The crew of L33 was questioned extensively by British military and scientific personnel. Even psychologists were brought in to exanimate the men mental profile. Such was the depth of the debriefing phase. As for the dirigible’s debris, they were studied by engineers for days. After authorities were satisfied that every drop of information was collected, the ship’s frame was burned to the ground.

In the final analysis, the end of L33 did not alter the rate of Zeppelin attacks, but what it did was to enforce a view held by many German commanders, Zeppelins alone would not defeat Great Britain. A new weapon was needed. One year later, that weapon would make its present felt..."

From "World War I, HP Willmott, Covent Gardens Books 2003"
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 6. Mai 2014, 12:47

Dear friends,

to the 100th Anniversary of beginning WWI. I'm showing the full text of the interessting letter from my collection from March 20th, 1916 from "The Knoll", 1 Craigcrook Road, Blackhall, Midlothian. It is a real document reflecting the zeitgeist. :D
This letter is incomplete sadly and finishes part way through a sentence about Zeppelins raids to England during WWI. I think, it related to the Great Zeppelin raid on January 31st,1916... 8-)

It was sent to a lady called Edith.
It is regarding the search from somewhere for Edith to convalesce from some sort of health problem. She has obviously considered Galashiels, but the sender of the letter tells her that Galashiels is only four miles from Melrose where there are big munitions works. Edith is now considering Lytham St. Annes and the sender thinks that this is probably a good idea, although her brother-in-law points out that Lytham is 18 1/2 miles from Barrow-in-Furness and 5 miles from Wigan where again, there are big munitions works and that there has already been one attempted zeppelin raid on Barrow - the send feels that fear of raids may hinder Edith's recovery.

Fascinating that such a letter was sent through the postal system during WWI - I would think the information within could have been useful to german spies or propaganda ! ;)

About Zeppelin raid on January 31st,1916:
"... It was about 8pm on Monday, January 31, when the people of Loughborough were greeted by a succession of loud explosions. Despite air raid warnings, the lights were in full blaze, causing a Zeppelin, which missed a blacked-out Leicester, to hit Loughborough instead. The first bomb dropped in the garden behind Orchard Street. Another quickly followed in The Rushes. From here the raiders passed to the Empress Works where two bombs were dropped, one falling near the Recreation ground, the other missing the works by a few yards..."
...and more:
http://net.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/memoir/zeppelin.html

Regards,
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 28. Dez 2014, 14:37

Dear friends,

...one day in history of the WWI is April 5th, 1916 during "big week" of Zeppelin raids from March 31st till April 6th, 1916.
In this day was raid of L-11 on Hull /East Yorkshire.

The postcard dated April 5th, 1916 in French from my collection about situation in London during Zeppelin raids. In London is "pas de danger/no danger", but all threat was in East- and North-East England.

"...On 5th April 1916 at 9.10pm, a Zeppelin at a height of 12,000 feet was caught in searchlights and hit. It dropped to about 6.000 feet. Only one bomb was dropped in Hull which damaged a private house in Portobello Street. No one was killed or injured, but Jesse Mathews from Barnsley Street died of shock..."

On April 5th, 1916 L-11 departed with a new commander Korvettenkapitan Viktor Schütze and with the two other Zeppelins. The airship went through the north of Spurn Head where it encountered some of the worst weather conditions for Zeppelins; rain, hail and snow accumulated on the gondolas and the feared St Elmos Fire accumulated over the machine guns and other objects. It was an ugly night. A strong storm with winds of up to 55 mph/h held the Zeppelin on the spot, but the winds fortunately gave it lift. In the morning the weather cleared showing the city of Hull.
Schütze saw Hull. The city lay before them defenceless, with no airplanes or batteries to defend them. The city of Hull received heavy damage. The people were so furious it is said they stoned a Royal Flying Corps truck.

The result of raid of L-11 on city of Hull (more properly, Kingston-on-Hull) in Yorkshire at April 5th, 1916. The top image is of Zeppelin L-11, which was driven off by guns and searchlights in a raid of 5/6 April 1916. The defenses were not so successful at other times, though. The images below show damage to Holy Trinity Church and a residential neighborhood. Fifty-one citizens were killed in the worst of the raids. (From Steve Suddaby's collection).

Another postcard titled "The Defeat of the Zeppelin" dated 5th April 1916 with a poem on the First World War Zeppelin raids with the first sentence: "The Zeppelin raider, with lust for blood". The postcard was printed by H. Miles, Charles Street.

Best regards,
pasol.
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon TALLTREES » 28. Dez 2014, 19:35

Hello. Here is an original and unique photo of the aftermath of a Zeppelin raid in the City of London. This photo and negative was given to me by a dear friend of mine who's grandmother was a "typewriter" either in the City or Central London during WW1. This photograph he told me was taken by one of his grandmothers fellow workmates from there office when they turned up for work the day after a Zeppelin raid. (not sure which)
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Re: ZEPPELIN COMBAT REPORT - LZ 97 RAID ON LONDON

Beitragvon pasol » 30. Dez 2014, 23:12

Dear friends,

we started this thread from report (Fahrtbericht) of commander of LZ 97 Oberleutnant Helmut Weidling about the raid on London at September 2nd-3rd, 1916.
Now, I can show the cover from my collection from Oberleutnant Helmuth Weidling soon after from September 13th, 1916 from Darmstadt to his wife. :D

Regards,
pasol.
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